Things They Don’t Tell You || Pregnancy Life

Pregnancy is an amazing time in life. It’s pretty amazing that the human body can grow another human in 10 months. Looking back, it’s insane to me that the 3mm dot we saw on an ultrasound screen back in March grew to be my Maddie.

You hear about all the joys of pregnancy often. An adorable belly, little kicks from the inside, longer hair (thanks, prenatals!), funny cravings… but there are so many things that I wish someone had warned me about! From pregnancy things I didn’t know about to parenting things I wasn’t told- there are so many things I wish I had been clued in on! I wanted to share some of those things in a series of posts.

Today: Things They Don’t Tell You || Pregnancy

  1. Morning sickness isn’t just for mornings
    Morning sickness, lunch time sickness, afternoon, evening, and night time sickness. It’s just sickness. For me, I felt sick every morning and every afternoon as soon as I’d get home from work. Like clockwork. What can you do to help? Ginger ale, ginger tea (Yogi makes a great ginger tea- very strong, though!), sour candies, saltines…all can help. If you want to go the medicine route, unisom and vitamin b6 works well for many women. You can also talk to your doctor about taking Zofran or another anti-nausea medication if you’re really sick.
  2. You won’t get many ultrasounds
    Going into pregnancy, you may think you’ll get ultrasounds often. Not the case! The majority of your appointments won’t last more than 15 minutes. Ultrasounds are most common on your first visit (to see the tiny little dot that is your baby), your anatomy scan (to make sure all organs are growing right- and to find out the sex!), and to measure growth at the end of your pregnancy. While this can be a bummer, it’s a good thing! Ultrasounds are only common practice if there’s some sort of issue that needs to be monitored. Most of the time, if you don’t have many ultrasounds, you’re considered low risk- a good thing!
  3. Aches and pains are common
    And it’s ok to call your OB about them! Cramping can be a common occurance which is a scary thing. Constipation causes incredible pain and I’d be lying if I said I didn’t call my OB due to that. It can be scary but, most of the time, minor cramping and pain here and there are totally normal. Keep in mind that your insides are being pushed and squeezed into new locations to make room for your baby!
  4. Panty liners are necessary
    You won’t get your period while pregnant, but you may lose some control of your bladder. Plan accordingly and you can laugh about it later.
  5. The last months are horrible.
    First trimester is notorious for being hard. Morning sickness is common and it’s the most common time for complications. It’s hard physically and emotionally. What no one tells you is that the last trimester can be equally as challenging. Sleep becomes impossible. Rolling out of bed is a workout. You will ache in places you never thought possible. If you make it to your due date, or even a week before, the waiting game can take a toll on you emotionally as well. Was that pain a labor pain? Was that leak my water breaking? There are so many things that mess with your head (so I’ve heard since I didn’t make it that far).What can you do? First, grab yourself some Unisom and get some sleep. Talk to your OB first, but I was told by my OB that Unisom tabs (not gels!) are safe when pregnant. If you don’t want to take a pharmaceutical, try natural solutions like sleepy time tea or melatonin- as long as you’ve cleared whatever you’re taking with your OB or midwife. If the waiting game is causing you stress and anxiety, talk to your doctor. He or she may be able to offer resources to help you and they may be willing to talk to you about scheduling an induction date. While most doctors prefer the baby makes his or her appearance on its own, sometimes the stress of waiting can be bad enough that it’s just better to induce. Induction doesn’t always mean pitocin! There are different things that can be used to induce labor. In my experience, this generally doesn’t happen until after a woman’s due date, but it’s still something to keep in mind should you start to have serious anxiety about labor.

Those are a few things I wish I’d known about pregnancy. If you’ve been pregnant, what are some things you’d add to this list?

Carrie Signature


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